1 October

Art Column: Week of September 20th, 2015

  In case You Missed It… The gallery’s own Jeremy Hansen launches new show, “Only Human” Jeremy Hansen opened his new solo show, “Only Human”, on Saturday, September 12th, at the Atomic Cafe Gallery in Hamtramck. Works include paintings on canvas and paper, audio/video installations and sculptures made of tires.  If you missed the opening, It’s not too late […]

21 November

Leo Kuschel Opens Tonight

Leo Kuschel opens tonight 6-10pm for his annual show here at River’s Edge. Thank you to the News Herald for the ink! Read the article here.

27 June

Motor City Griot Society: Forty Statements

by: Stephanie Knight West African Tradition Meets Detroit Industrialism In a world where white collar jobs are increasingly in demand and blue collar jobs are few and far between, Detroit industry has endured. There are some, however, who doubt this endurance. There is a debate about the rebirth of Detroit: is it reality or wishful […]

14 March

2014 Season Opener

Who: Maralena Howard, Tim Southward, M.E. Croci What: “Status Chroma” When: March 21st-April 30th, Opening and Meet the Artists on Friday, March 21st 6-10pm. Where: River’s Edge Gallery 3024 Biddle Ave. Wyandotte, MI 48192 Contact Info: 734-246-9880  info@artattheedge.com On Friday March 21st, 6-10pm, River’s Edge Gallery at 3024 Biddle in Wyandotte, MI will host a […]

28 February

Art Exhibit in Denver

Posted by in The Art Column | No Comments

By: Stephanie Knight   I’ve been to several renown art museums over the years. The Met in New York, the Toledo Museum of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and of course the Detroit Institute of Arts. This past week, I was fortunate enough to make it out to Denver. I wasn’t able to get […]

19 February

Movie Reminds Viewers of Art’s Mission

by: Stephanie Knight  Art is Priceless In “Raiders of the Lost Ark,” there is a scene in which Indiana Jones points a grenade launcher at the stolen Ark of the Covenant. Jones thought that by threatening the Ark, he could convince his rival to give it back.  His rival, a French archaeologist named Belloq, remains […]

17 February

Detroit Artist Patty Izzo – Women’s Caucus of the Arts Best of 2014

Detroit Artist Patty Izzo – Women’s Caucus of the Arts Best of 2014

#ArtofNewDetroit Heads to Chicago #ArtofNewDetroit, #theArtist and #theIdiot is going to take a sudden turn for the day. We are celebrating Detroit’s very own Patty Izzo and her accomplishment of being chosen to represent the Women’s Caucus of the Arts Best of 2014. For anyone reading this article and not familiar with the series #theArtist […]

12 February

Valentine’s Day

Posted by in The Art Column | No Comments

by: Stephanie Knight Valentine’s Day is this Friday. It’s a000 funny holiday, when you think about it. There’s not the same financial pressure like there is on Christmas. You’re not expected to get your sweetheart copious gifts, but the gift you decide on has a greater emotional weight to it. Of course, there are some […]

4 February

April at Detroit Institute of Arts Special Spring Break art-making activities part of April fun

(Detroit)—In addition to a variety of activities for all ages, exhibitions on view include: Samurai: Beyond the Sword, Let Me Show You What I Saw: American Views on City and County, 1912-1963, and Foto Europa, 1850 to the Present, on view through April 27.

Programs are free with museum admission unless otherwise noted. For more information, call (313) 833-7900 or visit www.dia.org.

Guided Tours: Tuesdays–Fridays, 1 p.m.; Saturdays–Sundays, 1 & 3 p.m.

Detroit City Chess Club: Fridays, 4–8 p.m.
The club’s mission is to teach area students the game and life lessons. Members have won state, regional and national competitions. People wanting to learn how to play chess should show up between 4 and 6 p.m. There will be no teaching between 6 and 8 p.m., but visitors can play chess.

Drawing in the Galleries (for all ages): Fridays, 6–9 p.m. Sundays, noon–4 p.m.

Drop-In Workshops (for all ages)
Fridays, 6–9 p.m. Celebration Masks: Create a colorful carnival mask using feathers, ribbon, glitter and more.
Saturdays, Noon–4 p.m. Cylinder Seals: Seals were used by people in Sumeria (present day Iraq) as a signature and to prove ownership.  Carve a simple wax crayon to make your own personal seal.
Sundays, Noon–4 p.m. The Artable Egg: Transform a variety of egg-shaped materials, into miniature works of art.

Special Spring Break Drop-in Workshops: Musical Instruments April 22–25 
Tuesday, April 22, 11–3 p.m. Sistrums: Sistrums are sacred rattles carried by royal women during ceremonies in ancient Egypt. Create your own simple version.
Wednesday, April 23, 11–3 p.m. Kalimbas: Make a simple version of this West African instrument using tongue depressors, scrap wood and colored markers.
Thursday, April 24, 11–3 p.m. Rattles: Small containers and boxes morph into fantastic percussion instruments when dried beans, rice, feathers and fun papers are added. 
Friday, April 25, 11–3 p.m. Tambourines: Learn about the history of this percussion instrument and make a simple version of your own.

Wednesday, April 2
Detroit Film Theatre: Il Gioielliono (The Jewel): 6 p.m.
Il Gioiellino is a tale of Italy’s largest corporate fraud. Ernesto Botta is a disagreeable accountant at the Rastelli’s family-owned agribusiness, which is quoted on the stock exchange and has launched into new international markets. Reckless and irresponsible management inevitably leads the company to the verge of bankruptcy, but Botta has a plan for inflating the company’s financial statements, thereby pulling himself from the morass. In Italian with English subtitles.  Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Friday Night Live, April 4
Music: Musicians from the Tuesday Musicale Student League: 7 & 8:30 p.m. 
The Tuesday Musicale Student League consists of classical musicians between the ages of 12 and 19. They meet once a month to perform for each other, prepare for competitions and for careers in classical music performance. The very best of this group will play a wide range of classical music.

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 7 p.m.
This documentary, shot from 1968–73, follows an elderly couple living on a farmstead in the hills of Burgundy, France. It is an ode to the beauty of rural France, the simplicity of daily peasant life, and the nearly wordless intimacy of a lifelong relationship. In French with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: In Bloom: 9:30 p.m.
Life holds surprises at every turn for two girls in the early 1990s in the newly independent Georgia, following the collapse of the Soviet Union,, including friends dealing with early marriage and disillusioned love. In Georgian with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Saturday, April 5
Lecture: Martial Arts: Civil and Military Interactions in Ming Dynasty China: 2 p.m.
Professor Kathleen Ryor of Carleton College will talk about how in Ming dynasty China military men often participated broadly in scholarly and artistic activities, while many influential literati actively engaged in pursuits associated with the warrior class. Sponsored by Asian & Islamic Art Forum

Detroit Film Theatre: The Sword of Doom: 3 p.m.
In the 1860s, the savage behavior of an outcast samurai leaves him little choice other than to make his living as a paid assassin. His fearsome authority is challenged, however—and his life placed in jeopardy—when he makes an enemy of the only samurai who is his equal as a swordsman. In Japanese with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 7 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: In Bloom: 9:30 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Family Sunday, April 6
Artist Demonstration: Ikebana, the Art of Flower Arranging: Noon–4 p.m.
Members of the Ikebana International Detroit chapter illustrate the principles and practice behind the art of traditional Japanese flower arranging. 

Sunday Music Bar: Pianist Pam Wise: 1–4 p.m.
Pianist Pam Wise performs R&B and jazz standards. 

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 2 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: In Bloom: 4:30 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Thursday, April 11
Lecture: Charles E. Burchfield: Inventive Virtuoso: 7 p.m.
Nancy Weekly, curator, Burchfield Penney Art Center, SUNY Buffalo, talks about artist Charles E. Burchfield, who has been identified as a naturalist, realist, modernist, romantic and transcendentalist. He pioneered watercolor techniques and invented symbols to convey emotions and sensations in his artworks. Burchfield’s range of interests, passionate devotion to nature and cyclical interpretation of subjects keeps his work fascinating to audiences today. Sponsored by Forum for Prints, Drawings, and Photographs

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 9:30 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Friday Night Live, April 11
Music: Mr. B’s Blues and Boogie Piano Celebration: 7 & 8:30 p.m. 
Mr. B stages his annual Blues and Boogie Piano Celebration in Ann Arbor each year. This year the DIA is host to an additional evening of Boogie Woogie piano featuring Mr. B and German pianist Axel Zwingenberger. Boogie Woogie is a profound, expressive and powerful style of piano playing, firmly rooted in the Blues and played here by two masters of the style.

Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows (The British Television Advertising Awards): 7 p.m.
Some of the most entertaining and creative examples of British filmmaking are found in their incomparable television advertising. Britain’s unique, visually audacious Mad Men consistently fashion imaginative, witty, technically sophisticated cutting-edge productions that have been the earliest showcases for soon-to-be celebrated filmmakers. (Short films of varying lengths, total running time approximately 150 minutes). Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 9:30 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Saturday, April 12
Detroit Film Theatre: 13 ASSASSINS: 3 p.m.
Set near the end of the feudal era, 13 Assassins is the story of a group of unemployed samurai recruited to bring down a sadistic lord and prevent him from ascending to the throne. In Japanese with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows (The British Television Advertising Awards): 7 p.m.
(See April 11 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 9:30 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Family Sunday, April 13
Artist Demonstration: Toby Millman, Printmaker: Noon–4 p.m.
Toby Millman demonstrates the intaglio printing techniques that have earned her images wide acclaim.

Sunday Music Bar: Pianist Stefan Kukurugya: 1–4 p.m.
Pianist Stefan Kukurugya performs jazz, pop, R&B, and classical standards.

Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows (The British Television Advertising Awards): 2 p.m.
(See April 11 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Cousin Jules: 4:30 p.m.
(See April 4 for details)

Thursday, April 17
Lecture: The Art of the Photobook: 7 p.m.
The art of photography has long been associated with the photobook — a publication envisioned by photographers as a work of art in and of itself. Aperture photobook editor Denise Wolff discusses the history of the photobook and her contributions to the field. Sponsored by Forum for Prints, Drawings and Photographs and Amerisure

Friday Night Live, April 18
Music: A Story of Floating Weeds featuring music by Alex di Grassi: 7 p.m.
Alex de Grassi was commissioned by the New York Guitar Festival to compose and perform his original score for Yasusjiro Ozu’s 1934 silent film A Story of Floating Weeds. The score is for acoustic guitar, which suggests the sound of the koto, a Japanese harp-like instrument. This classic tale is the story of a travelling actor who returns to a small town where he reunites with his former lover and their illegitimate son, which causes endless complications, including the wrath of his current mistress. Free.

Detroit Film Theatre: Exhibition: 9:30 p.m.
Blending an avant-garde vision with the traditions of the suspense thriller, the exciting new British film artist Joanna Hogg has created a mesmerizing, minimalist, intensely character-driven chronicle of a married, middle-aged couple, both artists, living and working in their architecturally unique London home. Hogg’s cleverly labyrinthine story structure mirrors the nooks and crannies of the film’s setting, eventually implicating the viewer in the movie’s mystery. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Saturday, April 19
Detroit Film Theatre: Yojimbo: 3 p.m.
The great Toshiro Mifune is a masterless samurai who wanders into a village terrorized by two equally evil, constantly warring factions. Seeing a way to turn the situation to his advantage, Mifune decides to secretly sell his services as a master sworsdsman to both sides, resulting in a tidal wave of apocalyptic swordplay. Remade by Italy’s Sergio Leone as A Fistful of Dollars. In Japanese with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: Exhibition: 7 p.m.
(See April 18 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows (The British Television Advertising Awards): 9:30 p.m.
(See April 11 for details)

Family Sunday, April 20
Sunday Music Bar: Pianist Cliff Monear: 1–4 p.m.
Pianist Cliff Monear performs jazz and pop standards.

Detroit Film Theatre: British Arrows (The British Television Advertising Awards): 4:30 p.m.
(See April 11 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Exhibition: 2 p.m.
(See April 18 for details)

Wednesday, April 23
Lecture: Skyscraper Urbanism: The Singer Building in Context: 6:30 p.m.
New York’s Singer Building, the world’s tallest building when completed in 1908, defied the rules of real estate and skyscraper construction. Inspired by the DIA’s recent acquisition of the Singer Building Grille, Hilary Ballon, New York University professor, puts this unusual building in historical context and explains how it modeled a new, influential approach to skyscraper urbanism. Sponsored by Associates of the American Wing
Friday Night Live, April 25
Music: The Blueflowers: 7 & 8:30 p.m.
Detroit band the Blueflowers are led by songwriting duo Tony Hamera and Kate Hinote. Their songs contain elements of Folk-noir, Americana, 60s girl-pop, folk and psychadelia. The Blueflowers released their third and most ambitious recording, Stealing the Moon, in 2012, which has the feel of vintage Roy Orbison and the Zombies recordings, as well as the modern sounds of Neko Case and Nick Cave. 

Detroit Film Theatre: Faust: 7 p.m.
From the visionary director of Russian Ark comes a stunning, hallucinatory adaptation of Goethe’s play about a man whose quest to transcend human boundaries leads him to sell his soul to the devil. One of the most popular legends in western literature, the story has surfaced in many forms; Sokurov’s phantasmagoric spectacle conjures the essence of all of them. In German with English Subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: Exhibition: 9:45 p.m.
(See April 18 for details)

Saturday, April 26
Detroit Film Theatre: The 46th Michigan Student Film & Video Festival: 10 a.m.
The Michigan Student Film & Video Festival is unique in the nation for providing a public venue for the work of students in grades K–12, as well as giving recognition and significant awards to young media artists. Now in its 46th year, the festival is presented by Digital Arts, Film & Television and co-sponsored by the Detroit Film Theatre and supported by the Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs. 

Lecture: Gallery in a Garden, Garden in a Gallery: The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia: 2 p.m.
In May 2012, the Barnes Foundation opened its downtown Philadelphia doors after a controversial move from its original home in suburban Merion. Tod Williams, principal, Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects, discusses the design for the new building, conceived as a “gallery in a garden and a garden in a gallery.” Sponsored by the Dr. Coleman Mopper Memorial Endowment Fund in conjunction with the European Paintings Council and the Visiting Committee for European Sculpture and Decorative Arts

Detroit Film Theatre: Saturday Animation Club: Howl’s Moving Castle: 3 p.m.
Teenage Sophie finds her life thrown into turmoil when she is swept off her feet by a handsome but mysterious wizard named Howl. As the true power of Howl’s wizardry is revealed, and his relationship with Sophie deepens, she finds herself fighting to protect them both from a dangerous war of sorcery that threatens their world. Tickets: $5.

Detroit Film Theatre: Faust: 7 p.m.
(See April 25 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Exhibition: 9:45 p.m.
(See April 18 for details)

Family Sunday, April 27
Artist Demonstration: Graem Whyte: Noon–4 p.m.
Graem Whyte discusses and modifies his large scale interactive pieces created to enhance the infrastructural systems of Popps Packing, an arts compound in northwestern Hamtramck.

Sunday Music Bar: Pianist Buddy Budson: 1–4 p.m. 
Pianist Buddy Budson performs jazz and pop standards.

Detroit Film Theatre: The Last of the Unjust: 1 p.m.
In this exploration of contested history, Holocaust documentarian Claude Lanzmann (Shoah) revisits a 1975 interview, never made public before, with Benjamin Murmelstein, the Viennese rabbi who worked with Adolf Eichmann to arrange the emigration of 120,000 Jews, an ethically thorny collaboration that saved many lives, landed Murmelstein in prison and made him an endlessly controversial figure. In French and German with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Detroit Film Theatre: Faust: 6 p.m.
(See April 25 for details)

Detroit Film Theatre: Viva La Liberta: 8:30 p.m.
Enrico Oliveri is a man of the left, and secretary of the main opposition party. Challenged during a congress and defeated by a recent poll, he takes a break and leaves behind his wife, home, country and party. Unbeknownst to Enrico, in his absence he is replaced with his twin brother Giovanni, a professor of philosophy who has serious problems of his own. In Italian with English subtitles. Tickets are $8.50, and $6.50 for DIA members, students and seniors.

Hours and Admission
Museum hours are 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Tuesdays–Thursdays, 9 a.m.–10 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62+, $4 for ages 6–17, and free for residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties and DIA members. For membership information, call 313-833-7971.

###

The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 60,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. From the first Van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self-Portrait, 1887), to Diego Rivera’s world-renowned Detroit Industry murals (1932–33), the DIA’s collection is known for its quality, range, and depth. The DIA’s mission is to create opportunities for all visitors to find personal meaning in art.

Programs are made possible with support from residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties.
31 January

Art Collecting in Detroit

by: Stephanie Knight The art world in Detroit is something that keeps rearing its head in the news. Most notably, the D.I.A and the fight to keep the artwork in Detroit. However, there’s more to Detroit than the art at the D.I.A. Not suggesting the D.I.A’s collection is shabby, but art is not just for […]

31 January

Day of the Dead – Featured Detroit Art by a Featured Detroit Artist

Day of the Dead – Featured Detroit Art by a Featured Detroit Artist

Hola 2014, #ArtofNewDetroit and Detroit Artists The Artist and the Idiot has not been published in a month. Balancing time writing about art, building the gallery website and working with our Detroit artists is a huge time commitment. #TheArtist – Art is a Commitment If I thought balancing my time was a challenge, Jeremy’s commitment […]

27 January

The Dirty Show–Detroit

The Dirty Show by: Stephanie Knight It’s almost that time of year again: the Dirty Show. This is the show in which artists from around the world exhibit their more sensual art. The point of the show is to promote erotic art in all its forms. River’s Edge Gallery has many artists showing their art […]

22 January

Detroit Institute of Arts Statement regarding Wednesday’s Announcement by Governor Snyder

Governor Snyder’s announcement is continued good news for the City of Detroit, its pensioners and the DIA. Support from the Governor and legislative leadership, the foundation community and our supporters underscores the importance of the DIA in building a strong, healthy city and state. We are working hard to play an active and thoughtful role in this ongoing process that will allow for a significant contribution to this effort and ensure long-term support for the City’s pension funds and sustainability for the DIA. While there has been a great deal of speculation as to the DIA’s participation in this effort, the DIA remains focused on continuing conversations with the mediation team, state, county and city officials, our board members, staff and supporters to determine how we can be as productive and supportive as possible in this process, with the ultimate goal of a balanced, achievable solution that provides for strong DIA involvement in this emerging plan and ensures the museum’s ability to meet its immediate budget commitments and long-term endowment needs.

###

Contact:   Pamela Marcil   313-833-7899   pmarcil@dia.org   www.dia.org

21 January

Detroit Institute of Arts Statement issued in response to Detroit News editorial regarding free general admission for tri-county residents

While it is difficult to counter the deluge of misinformation that surrounds the City of Detroit’s bankruptcy and the DIA’s involvement in this issue, we feel compelled to state that under no circumstances will we alter the free general admission policy for residents of Macomb, Oakland and Wayne counties. Reports suggesting that the DIA should consider this option are simply misguided. The DIA is committed to maintaining its commitments to the counties through the ten years of millage funding. We remain grateful to tri-county residents for their support and look forward to welcoming them to the DIA.

 
###
20 January

Upcoming Shows

The next few months will bring exciting new art to the gallery. We want you to stay up to date on everything in the Detroit art world so here’s a breakdown of what you can expect in the coming months: Glass Month-Michigan Since 1980, many galleries have dedicated part of their space to Glass Month. […]

17 January

Gary Grimshaw

by: Stephanie Knight For those of you who don’t know me, I am the Promotional Director at River’s Edge Gallery. Even though I’ve been exposed to the Detroit art world, every now and then I discover an artist I never knew existed. This happened earlier this week. I came to work and was bombarded by […]

14 January

Satori Circus celebrates 25th Anniversary with Performance at Detroit Institute of Arts – Free performance includes new acts influenced by classic pieces

Contact:  Larisa Zade  313-833-7962   lmzade@dia.org   www.dia.org

MEDIA ALERT
 

WHAT: The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) will host the 25th-anniversary performance of Satori Circus—a one-person stage act. Satori Circus will perform 63 Minutes (of Random Balance), which is an original set of performances, some influenced by themes from the late 1980s and ‘90s.

WHERE: Detroit Film Theatre, 5200 Woodward Avenue

WHEN: Friday, January 24, 7 and 9 p.m.

OTHER: Both performances are free and recommended for ages 12 and older.

SPONSOR: This event is co-sponsored by Friends of Modern and Contemporary Art and Friday Night Live at the DIA

Hours and Admission
Museum hours are 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Tuesdays–Thursdays, 9 a.m.–10 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. Admission is $8 for adults, $6 for seniors, $4 for ages 6–17, and free for DIA members and residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties. For membership information call 313-833-7971.

###

The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 60,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. From the first Van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self-Portrait, 1887), to Diego Rivera’s world-renowned Detroit Industry murals (1932–33), the DIA’s collection is known for its quality, range, and depth. The DIA’s mission is to create opportunities for all visitors to find personal meaning in art.

Programs are made possible with support from residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties. 

13 January

Detroit Institute of Arts’ Statement regarding Statement from Detroit Bankruptcy Mediators

The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) is an active partner in the effort to develop a solution that will assist in the revitalization of the City of Detroit and safeguard the museum’s collection. The DIA has been working actively with U.S. Chief District Judge Gerald Rosen and attorney Eugene Driker, the appointed mediators in Detroit’s bankruptcy, to ensure the success of a fundraising effort that will ultimately provide protection for the DIA art collection and much-needed financial assistance for the City. The DIA’s long and strong relationship with national and local foundations has contributed to their willingness to provide the financial framework for this plan, and the museum has committed to providing both fundraising support and programming to the effort.

The DIA is engaged in developing the operational framework for this agreement and would like to commend all those involved on making significant progress in a very short time. Final details of the agreement are still in development and will be released by the mediators and the team when available.

The DIA encourages those who wish to support this effort financially to contribute to the Fund to Support Detroit‘s Retirees, Cultural Heritage and Revitalization by going to the Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan’s website at cfsem.org. Public support is welcome and deeply appreciated at this critical moment in the negotiations.

###
9 January

Detroit Institute of Arts open on Martin Luther King, Jr. Day – Tours of the African American art collection and King documentary among special activities

Contact: Larisa Zade 313-833-7962   lzade@dia.org www.dia.org 

(Detroit)—The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) will be open on Martin Luther King, Jr.,  Day, Monday, Jan. 20 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visitors can enjoy the special activities listed below, which are free with museum admission, and free for residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties, unless otherwise noted. 
  
Drop-In Workshops—Tibetan Prayer Flags (for all ages): 11 a.m.–3 p.m.
Learn how Tibetan prayer flags are made and used while you create your own personal flag to take home.

Guided Tours of the African American Art Collection: 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.
Take a guided tour of the African American art galleries, which feature works by artists such as Benny Andrews, Ali McGee, Tyree Guyton, Hughie Lee-Smith, Jacob Lawrence and many others. Tours leave from the Great Hall.
 
Detroit Film Theatre: King: A Filmed Record…Montgomery to Memphis: 2 p.m. 
Constructed from a wealth of archival footage, King: A Filmed Record…Montgomery to Memphis is a monumental documentary that follows Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., from 1955 to 1968 as he rises from regional activist to world-renowned leader of the Civil Rights movement. Rare footage of King’s speeches, protests and arrests are interspersed with scenes of other high-profile supporters and opponents of the cause. Tickets: $8.50; DIA members, seniors and students, $6.50.
  
Hours and Admission
Museum hours are 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Tuesdays–Thursdays, 9 a.m.–10 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. General admission (excludes ticketed exhibitions) is free for Wayne, Oakland and Macomb county residents and DIA members. For all others, $8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62+, $4 for ages 6–17. For membership information, call 313-833-7971.

###

The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 60,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. From the first Van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self-Portrait, 1887), to Diego Rivera’s world-renowned Detroit Industry murals (1932–33), the DIA’s collection is known for its quality, range, and depth. The DIA’s mission is to create opportunities for all visitors to find personal meaning in art.

Programs are made possible with support from residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties.
9 January

Samurai: Beyond the Sword coming to Detroit Institute of Arts in March – Armor, swords, paintings, ceramics and more showcase culture of Japan’s elite samurai

Contact:   Pamela Marcil 313-833-7899 pmarcil@dia.org www.dia.org

(Detroit)—There is a lot more to the legendary Japanese samurai than meets the eye, and visitors to the Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA) exhibition Samurai: Beyond the Sword will experience the nuanced culture of these revered warriors through more than 125 artworks that tell their story. The exhibition is on view March 9–June 1, 2014.


Samurai: Beyond the Sword is based on the traveling exhibition Lethal Beauty: Samurai Weapons and Armor, from the collection of the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture. Birgitta Augustin, DIA associate curator and acting department head of Arts of Asia & the Islamic World, along with consultant Masako Watanabe, curated Samurai: Beyond the Sword

The exhibition offers an in-depth look at the samurai—shoguns (supreme military rulers), daimyo (regional lords) and soldiers—who sought balance between military and cultural pursuits. The exhibition explores artworks that project the image of the samurai not only as fierce warriors but also as patrons of the arts and sophisticated artists and scholars during the relatively peaceful Edo period (1603–1868). 

“There has long been a fascination with Japan’s elite samurai warriors,” said Graham W. J. Beal, DIA director. “Some people might not be aware that to become a samurai, study of the arts and literature was required, along with military training. The artworks in the exhibition provide a look at these various facets of samurai culture.”

Menacing suits of armor and meticulously crafted sword blades are evidence of the samurai’s military might, while exquisitely painted scenes of nature and finely crafted tea ceremony objects reveal their aesthetic ideals. Many objects used for battle are embellished with artistic, literary and spiritual symbols, illustrating the integration of samurai values. 

Among the artworks are helmets, face masks, and paintings of legendary Buddhist and Chinese figures, as well as scenes of epic battles, shimmering Noh theatre costumes and illustrated classical literature on screen and scroll paintings. These and other objects reveal the principles of awareness and mindfulness that samurai pursued throughout their lives.

Samurai means “one who serves,” and, at one point, they were warriors who served Japan’s emperor and nobility as swords for hire. Over time, the samurai organized into powerful warrior bands with the manpower and military training to grasp political control for themselves. For several centuries, warring samurai factions battled for land and supremacy.

This changed in 1603, when the country was unified by Tokugawa leyasu, the supreme military ruler, known as the shogun. The rigid laws and social hierarchy he and his successors enforced kept Japan relatively peaceful under the Tokugawa rule for more than 250 years. As warfare became less prevalent, samurai military equipment became powerful displays of warrior heritage, pride and power.

The samurai were officially disbanded in 1876 and were no longer permitted to carry swords. The exhibition presents innovative examples of how samurai weapons and fittings were recycled and given new purposes, such as a bonsai basin from sword sheaths and a pill box from sword fittings.

An array of programs will be offered to enhance the themes in the exhibition, including artist demonstrations of a Japanese tea ceremony, floral arranging, martial arts, kiting, bunraku-inspired puppets and performances on traditional Japanese instruments. Among the Detroit Film Theatre offerings are The Sword of Doom from 1965; A Story of Floating Weeds, a 1934 silent film presented with live music; and 2004’s The Twilight Samurai, winner of 12 Japanese Academy Awards.   

A special preview will be hosted by the DIA auxiliary Asian & Islamic Art Forum on March 8 from 6 to 10 p.m. Tickets are $250 and include a reception with cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, a three-course dinner with a Japanese flair, an exhibition viewing and valet parking. Ticket information is available at www.dia.org/aiaf.

A catalog of the traveling exhibition, Lethal Beauty: Samurai Weapons and Armor, is available in soft cover for $20 in the DIA’s museum shop. A special issue of the DIA’s Bulletin, featuring essays by nine experts on the art and arts of Japan’s warriors, will be available in the museum shop for $15.

Exhibition tickets are on sale now and are $16 for adults, $8 for ages 6–17, and free for DIA members. Group tickets (15+) are $12 per ticket and discounts are available for early reservations. Purchase at DIA Box Office, dia.org or 313.833.4005. A $3.50 charge applies to nonmember tickets not purchased at the DIA. Tickets are timed, and advance purchase is recommended.

This exhibition is organized by the Detroit Institute of Arts, based on the original exhibition Lethal Beauty, curated by Dr. Andreas Marks for the Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, with tour organized by International Arts & Artists, Washington, DC. 

In Detroit, the exhibition is generously supported by Toyota, DENSO International America, Inc., E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, and Yazaki North America, Inc.

Ed. Note: Save the Date – Media preview March 6, 10 a.m.

Hours and Admission
Museum hours are 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Tuesdays–Thursdays, 9 a.m.–10 p.m. Fridays, and 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays. General admission (excludes ticketed exhibitions) is free for Wayne, Oakland and Macomb county residents and DIA members. For all others, $8 for adults, $6 for seniors ages 62+, $4 for ages 6–17. For membership information, call 313-833-7971.

###

The Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), one of the premier art museums in the United States, is home to more than 60,000 works that comprise a multicultural survey of human creativity from ancient times through the 21st century. From the first Van Gogh painting to enter a U.S. museum (Self-Portrait, 1887), to Diego Rivera’s world-renowned Detroit Industry murals (1932–33), the DIA’s collection is known for its quality, range, and depth. The DIA’s mission is to create opportunities for all visitors to find personal meaning in art.

Programs are made possible with support from residents of Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties.